BMW Desenvolve Aerodinâmica Adaptativa
#1

Citar:BMW Developing Adaptive Aerodynamics

New patents show Bavaria is planning to grow wings.

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The latest-generation BMW S 1000 RR superbike hit the market shortly before it became clear that wings weren’t exclusively reserved for MotoGP machines-and now the firm is playing catch-up by developing movable winglet technology.

With Ducati and Honda both opting to add downforce-generation winglets to their mainstream superbikes this year, it’s clear that this is a technology that all race-replica bikes will be rushing to adopt in their next-generation forms. With WSBK rules that only allow wings if they’re fitted as standard on the streetbike used for homologation, it’s inevitable that we’ll enter an era of technical one-upmanship as firms scramble for every last racetrack advantage. And there’s a marketing benefit for road-going models as well; how much downforce your bike makes at highway speed could soon be a specification that’s mentioned alongside power and weight.

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So far, the wings appearing on streetbikes have followed the patterns seen in MotoGP. That makes sense from a marketing perspective and saves money as R&D has already been done into those wing designs. However, MotoGP rules put strict limits on wing sizes and positions, as well as banning movable aerodynamic surfaces. On the street there are no such restrictions, and current WSBK race regulations are similarly open to the use of more extreme wing designs, including moving winglets, on the proviso that they must also be used on production bikes.

That brings us to BMW’s latest idea: front and rear winglets, mounted on the suspension rather than the bodywork, that can move in multiple directions to adjust their downforce and drag characteristics.

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While such designs wouldn’t be legal in MotoGP, that’s not a class BMW races in. The firm isn’t bound by MotoGP regulations or any marketing-driven need to replicate MotoGP-style winglets on streetbikes, so the intention appears to be to push the boundaries of what’s possible.

The images from the patent that shows the firm’s development ideas are typically simplistic, illustrating the concept without giving away too much detail in terms of final appearance. However, as well as illustrating normal, body-mounted airfoils they show an alternative layout with winglets mounted on the fork and swingarm.

It makes sense to put the wings straight into the unsprung parts of the bike rather than the bodywork, as it means their downforce acts directly on the wheels. Early attempts at putting wings on F1 cars followed a similar route, with airfoils attached to the suspension uprights rather than the bodywork-until that idea was banned.

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BMW’s wing design also allows the aerodynamic surfaces to move under the control of a central computer and actuators attached to each winglet. We’ve seen other patents exploring this idea-particularly from Honda-but BMW takes the thinking a step further. Honda’s idea, yet to be seen on a production bike but featuring in several patents, is to use retractable winglets that pull out of the airflow when they’re not needed, reducing drag. BMW, in contrast, aims to change the angle of its wings depending on speed, acceleration, cornering attitude, and throttle and brake positions. In its simplest form, the patent shows a single actuator attached to each winglet, changing its angle like the elevators and ailerons of an airplane. The same idea has also appeared on the firm’s patents for a new, roofed electric bike.

However, the latest patent takes that thinking even further. BMW’s engineers suggest that additional actuators could be used to alter the winglets' angle in the forward-rearward plane-making the winglets move like the swing-wings on an F-14 Tomcat. Another idea shows that a further actuator could be used to extend flap sections on the ends of the winglets, though the patent doesn’t describe what aerodynamic advantage would be gained from that.

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The chances are that the more extreme control movements suggested in BMW’s patent are a case of the firm covering all the bases rather than a real indication that the company intends to implement the ideas, but the pivoting, aileron-style movement is key to the entire concept.

It’s increasingly likely that BMW will add winglets of some sort to its bikes in the near future. The S 1000 RR is an obvious candidate, since race versions of the bike would stand to benefit, but BMW’s electric Vision DC Roadster concept-which had moving aero surfaces, with cooling systems that extend into the airflow-is also now known to be influencing a future range of road-going electric bikes going under the DC name.

Fonte: Cycleword
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#2

Isto, e dado a área industrial com que se iniciou a BMW, pode-se concluir que é um regresso às origens!? devil
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#3

(14-09-2020 às 13:01)LoneRider Escreveu:  Isto, e dado a área industrial com que se iniciou a BMW, pode-se concluir que é um regresso às origens!? devil

Ventoinhas com asas... oh wait! cool bigsmile
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#4

Espera aí... aonde é que isso de "aerodinâmica adaptativa" me soa familiar? think


Ahhh.... já me >>recordo<<!


Entretanto o resultado final e traduzido na prática disso... foi isto! redeye devil lol

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#5

A nota mais importante que retiro do artigo tem a ver com a parte "adaptável". Isto é, até ao momento, as marcas estão a aplicar o que tem sido feito ao nível de R&D em MotoGP. As regras em MotoGP limitam a construção destas "asas" para gerar downforce nas motas, nomeadamente pelo facto de terem de ser fixas.

No entanto, nada disso é muito relevante para motas de estrada, o que permitirá a sua eventual versão "adaptável" (além de poder também ser interessante para as SBK que não estão sujeitas às mesmas regras). Algo me diz que daqui a uns tempos a BMW não será única nesta derivação.

Posto isto, a real utilidade destas componentes em motas disponíveis para o público em geral (salvo raras exceções em que também se levem para um circuito fechado)... think pervert
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#6

É o trend dos novos anos 20...
Começa a fazer sentido o que escrevi aqui.

Anos 90 ... a maior evolução foi na procura de elevadas potências pico.
Anos 00 ... a maior evolução foi na procura de melhores ciclísticas.
Anos 10 ... a maior evolução foi na electrónica.
Anos 20 ... as grandes novidades será na aerodinâmica...

Muito provavelmente o que escrevi foi gerado automágicamente através do Moto Lero
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#7

(14-09-2020 às 20:32)dfelix Escreveu:  É o trend dos novos anos 20...
Começa a fazer sentido o que escrevi aqui.

Anos 90 ... a maior evolução foi na procura de elevadas potências pico.
Anos 00 ... a maior evolução foi na procura de melhores ciclísticas.
Anos 10 ... a maior evolução foi na electrónica.
Anos 20 ... as grandes novidades será na aerodinâmica...

Anos 30 ... as grandes novidades será as eléctricas? nausea

Live After Death...

Os Ferros...

In life, nothing happens by chance...
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#8

(15-09-2020 às 15:13)FerroH Escreveu:  Anos 30 ... as grandes novidades será as eléctricas? nausea

Abraça o futuro ferro! cool

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#9

(15-09-2020 às 15:16)el_Bosco Escreveu:  
(15-09-2020 às 15:13)FerroH Escreveu:  Anos 30 ... as grandes novidades será as eléctricas? nausea

Abraça o futuro ferro! cool

Ok eu vou abraçar... lol

na fogueira...

Ok sempre dá para ir montando uns pneus... lol

Live After Death...

Os Ferros...

In life, nothing happens by chance...
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#10

(15-09-2020 às 15:19)FerroH Escreveu:  Ok eu vou abraçar... lol

na fogueira...

Como é que isto é mau? (minuto 4:06)


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